Tests and CI for Blogging App

Mocha / Chai Unit Testing

Tests and CI for Blogging App

by John Vincent


Posted on April 06, 2017



Add Mocha and Chai unit tests to blogging ExpressJS web services.

Configure Github, Travis and Heroku so that a change to a Github repository triggers a Travis CI build which executes Mocha/Chai Unit Tests and if successful, deploys to Heroku.

Final Result

My Git repository

Git Readme

App at Heroku

Test GET at Heroku

Test GET from curl

curl -H "Content-Type:application/json" "https://enigmatic-citadel-18351.herokuapp.com/blog"

Balsamiq Mock Ups

Tasks

For the Blogging Application, these are the requirements for this challenge:

  • add integration tests for all 4 of the API endpoints.
  • configure continuous integration so that TravisCI runs your tests each time you push changes to GitHub.
  • the app deploys to Heroku any time pushes and merges to master happen and the tests pass.

Thinkful solution git repository

Setup

  • Local: /Users/jv/Desktop/MyDevelopment/github/thinkful/blogging-challenge
  • Created new Github repository: blogging-challenge
  • Cloned repository

Development

Copied blogging app from

/Users/jv/Desktop/MyDevelopment/github/thinkful/nodejs-1/1.4.7-challenge-blog-api

to

/Users/jv/Desktop/MyDevelopment/github/thinkful/blogging-challenge

git push code to master

Client App

Added client app to test the application. Test app here…

Added to server.js

app.use(express.static('public'));

app.get('/', (req, res) => {
    res.sendFile(__dirname + '/views/index.html');
});

Setup

Express is already installed globally. This creates problems with Devtool. Thus, first uninstall and install local:

npm uninstall -g express

npm install express --save

Install:

npm install morgan --save
npm install body-parser --save
npm install uuid --save

Install Mocha & Chai:

npm install chai --save-dev
npm install chai-http --save-dev
npm install mocha --save-dev

Add test to package.json:

"test": "mocha ./test"

server.js

Remove:

app.listen(process.env.PORT || 8080, () => {
    console.log(`Your app is listening on port ${process.env.PORT || 8080}`);
});

Add:

function runServer() {
    const port = process.env.PORT || 8080;
    return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
        app.listen(port, () => {
                console.log(`Your app is listening on port ${port}`);
                resolve();
            })
            .on('error', err => {
                reject(err);
            });
    });
}

let server;

function runServer() {
    const port = process.env.PORT || 8080;
    return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
        server = app.listen(port, () => {
            console.log(`Your app is listening on port ${port}`);
            resolve(server);
        }).on('error', err => {
            reject(err);
        });
    });
}

function closeServer() {
    return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
        console.log('Closing server');
        server.close(err => {
            if (err) {
                reject(err);
                return; // so we don't also call `resolve()`
            }
            resolve();
        });
    });
}

if (require.main === module) {
    runServer().catch(err => console.error(err));
}

module.exports = {
    app, runServer, closeServer
};

test-blog.js

Mocha tests go in a test directory.

mkdir test
touch test-blog.js

Create blog tests file test-blog.js

/* jshint node: true */
/* jshint esnext: true */

/*global describe, it, before, after */

'use strict';

const chai = require('chai');
const chaiHttp = require('chai-http');

const {app, runServer, closeServer} = require('../server');

const should = chai.should();

chai.use(chaiHttp);

Test

npm start

Test using the Testing URLs, ensure all is still well.

Test Using Mocha

npm test

which shows no tests but all is passing.

Mocha Testing in the real world

I found:

  1. that any mistake in the test-*.js files would be flagged by Mocha but wouldn’t tell me much of anything.
  2. Developing test-*.js files is extremely difficult to build in an engineering manner as I do not know the objects I am using.

Thus, using Devtool:

devtool ./node_modules/mocha/bin/_mocha ./test

However, I have no ability to set debug points before the app runs.

Thus, use debugger;

Start as close to the problem as possible (test-*.js) and work into the code to be tested. It takes a little patience, but it is very effective.

Final test-blog.js

/* jshint node: true */
/* jshint esnext: true */

/* global describe, it, before, after */

'use strict';

const chai = require('chai');
const chaiHttp = require('chai-http');

const {app, runServer, closeServer} = require('../server');

/* jshint -W098 */
const should = chai.should();

chai.use(chaiHttp);

describe('Blogs', function() {

    before(function() {
        return runServer();
    });

    after(function() {
        return closeServer();
    });

    it('should list blogs on GET', function() {
        // for Mocha tests, when we're dealing with asynchronous operations,
        // we must either return a Promise object or else call a `done` callback
        // at the end of the test. The `chai.request(server).get...` call is asynchronous
        // and returns a Promise, so we just return it.
        return chai.request(app)
            .get('/blog')
            .then(function(res) {
                res.should.have.status(200);
/* jshint -W030 */
                res.should.be.json;
                res.body.should.be.a('array');
                // because we create 3 items on app load
                res.body.length.should.be.at.least(1);
                const expectedKeys = ['id', 'title', 'content', 'author', 'publishDate'];
                res.body.forEach(function(item) {
                    item.should.be.a('object');
                    item.should.include.keys(expectedKeys);
                });
            });
    });

    it('should get the first blog on a GET by id', function() {
        return chai.request(app)
            .get('/blog')
            .then(function(res) {
                res.should.have.status(200);
                const firstItem = {
                    id: res.body[0].id,
                    title: res.body[0].title,
                    content: res.body[0].content,
                    author: res.body[0].author,
                    publishDate: res.body[0].publishDate
                };
                return chai.request(app)
                    .get('/blog/'+firstItem.id)
                    .then(function(res) {
                        res.should.have.status(200);
                        res.body.should.be.a('object');
                        res.body.should.include.keys('id', 'title', 'content', 'author', 'publishDate');

                        res.body.id.should.equal(firstItem.id);
                        res.body.title.should.equal(firstItem.title);
                        res.body.content.should.equal(firstItem.content);
                        res.body.author.should.equal(firstItem.author);
                        res.body.publishDate.should.equal(firstItem.publishDate);
                });
            });
    });

    it('should add a blog on POST', function() {
        const newItem = {
            title: 'title-99', content: 'content-99', author: 'author-99'
        };
        return chai.request(app)
            .post('/blog')
            .send(newItem)
            .then(function(res) {
                res.should.have.status(201);
            /* jshint -W030 */
                res.should.be.json;
                res.body.should.be.a('object');
                res.body.should.include.keys('id', 'title', 'content', 'author', 'publishDate');
                res.body.id.should.not.be.null;
                res.body.title.should.equal(newItem.title);
                res.body.content.should.equal(newItem.content);
                res.body.author.should.equal(newItem.author);
        });
    });

    it('should update a blog on PUT', function() {
        const updateItem = {
            title: 'title-99',
            content: 'content-99',
            author: 'author-99'
        };
        return chai.request(app)
            .get('/blog')
            .then(function(res) {
                res.should.have.status(200);
                updateItem.id = res.body[0].id;
                updateItem.publishDate = res.body[0].publishDate;
                return chai.request(app)
                    .put('/blog/' + updateItem.id)
                    .send(updateItem);
            })
            .then(function(res) {
                res.should.have.status(200);
            /* jshint -W030 */
                res.should.be.json;
                res.body.should.be.a('object');
                res.body.should.include.keys('id', 'title', 'content', 'author', 'publishDate');
                res.body.id.should.not.be.null;
                res.body.id.should.equal(updateItem.id);
                res.body.title.should.equal(updateItem.title);
                res.body.content.should.equal(updateItem.content);
                res.body.author.should.equal(updateItem.author);
                res.body.publishDate.should.equal(updateItem.publishDate);

            });
    });

    it('should delete the first blog on DELETE', function() {
        return chai.request(app)
            .get('/blog')
            .then(function(res) {
                res.should.have.status(200);
                return chai.request(app)
                    .delete('/blog/'+res.body[0].id);
            })
            .then(function(res) {
                res.should.have.status(204);
            });
    });

});

Travis CI

From Github

* Select blogging-challenge project
* Settings, Integrations & services (left menu)
* Add a Service (mid-right)
    * Select Travis CI from dropdown
    * Add service(green button at bottom)
* From Travis CI, click on <username>(top right)
    * Lists github projects
    * Activate blogging-challenge
* From github, blogging-challenge
    *  Settings, Integrations & services
        * Travis CI, Edit
            * Notice Travis CI entry in Webhooks

.travis.yml

language: node_js
node_js: node

Git push .travis.yml to master

From Travis CI:

  • Select User-name, Accounts (top-right)
  • Sync Account (top-right)
  • Turn on blogging-challenge
  • Select blogging-challenge
  • Travis builds the project, see Job log
  • When complete, Restart build appears (mid-right)

Set up continuous deployment

Configure Travis to work with Heroku.

  • Push changes to master on GitHub, or merge a pull request into master, our tests automatically run.
    • If our tests pass, TravisCI will deploy to Heroku. If our tests do not pass, it will not deploy.

If not already installed, install Travis CI command line interface

sudo gem install travis

Setup Travis to Deploy to Heroku Travis login requires my Github login.

cd {blogging-challenge directory}
travis login
and provide github username & password

or:
have already setup SSH for github, thus
travis login --auto-password

To deploy to Heroku:

* travis setup heroku
    * "return" to the questions.
* git diff (see differences)

Create app on Heroku

heroku create

Notice:

* App name: blooming-river-17701
* https://blooming-river-17701.herokuapp.com/
* https://git.heroku.com/blooming-river-17701.git

Edit .travis.yml

deploy:
    app: blooming-river-17701

Git commit changes to master

Test Heroku App

To run the app on Heroku:

https://blooming-river-17701.herokuapp.com/

Test CI is working

Change any file, git commit to master and verify Travis CI rebuilds the project.

Other

git remote -v

shows Github and Heroku repositories.